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Lamson Institute

Browse Training Programs by Industry

Construction Industry

HVAC Technician

Commercial HVAC/R Diploma Program

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Just like Electricians, HVAC Technicians are in high demand! Because homes and businesses rely on Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning systems to keep them comfortable, HVAC Technicians are critical and find themselves busy year-round in all parts of the country.

HVAC careers pay well too! Salary can vary widely by region and level of experience, but is generally comparable to an Electricians’ pay.

What does an HVAC Technician do?
HVAC Techs are skilled tradespeople knowledgeable about more than just HVAC technology, and use their knowledge of electricity, plumbing and welding on virtually a daily basis to perform their job duties.

Using these skills, HVAC Technicians manage air temperature and quality through installation, maintenance, inspection, and repair of the systems that control the climate in our homes, buildings, and vehicles.

Skills and responsibilities of HVAC Techs include:

Mechanical and electrical troubleshooting and circuit repair on residential and light commercial equipment
Residential and commercial condensing units, compressors and evaporator fan motor replacement
Installation and repair on residential and commercial gas heating systems
Service and repair of electric and hydronic heating systems
Startup of new a/c and heating equipment
Calculating and measuring airflow on a/c equipment
Service and repair of ice machines, walk-in coolers/freezers and reach-ins

Where can an HVAC Technician work?
HVAC technicians work in every part of the country! Every vehicle, home and building requires HVAC installation, maintenance, and service.

Graduates of Lamson’s HVAC training program are qualified to work for:

Air Conditioning/Heating companies
Mechanical Contractors
Construction sites
Server rooms and Data centers
Private industry
Major commercial companies
Hospitals
Hotels
Office buildings
Manufacturers
Become a Service Manager or own your own business!

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Electrician

Electrician Diploma Program

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Electricians are in high demand! Everything we do is somehow affected by electricity and our dependency on wires and circuits is only growing. With this growing need for electricity and power comes the need for more skilled, qualified, and experienced electricians. Plus, Electricians are paid well! According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS), the average annual pay for an Electrician was $52,720 in 2016.

What does an Electrician do?
Electricians install, maintain, and repair electrical power, communications, lighting, and control systems in homes, businesses, and factories.

Where can an Electrician work?
Electricians work in every building, in every town and every city across the country! As an Electrician, you can work anywhere you want to live. Electricians work indoors and outdoors in nearly every type of facility.

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Healthcare Industry

Laboratory Technician

Lab Assistant, EKG Technician, and Phlebotomist Diploma Program

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There is a growing need for Allied Health Professionals such as Lab Assistants, EKG Technicians and Phlebotomists! With an aging population, increasing life expectancies, and more people than ever before with health insurance, the Healthcare industry is booming, and it depends upon Allied Health Professionals to keep it moving. As a Lab Assistant, EKG Technician, or Phlebotomist you can become a valuable member of the healthcare profession.

What do Lab Assistants, EKG Technicians and Phlebotomists do?
Medical laboratory assistants have duties that include running lab tests and preparing specimens. Lab assistants may also be responsible for planting microbiology specimens, performing routine and specialized tests, preparing and staining slides for analysis, recording testing information, cleaning and restocking the lab facility, keeping inventory, and ordering lab supplies.

EKG technicians work in healthcare facilities with doctors and technologists and specialize in electrocardiogram (EKG) testing for patients. EKG machines are complex devices that monitor the heart’s performance. This is done by attaching wires and electrodes to a patient’s chest, arms and legs.

Phlebotomists are the health care professionals who draw blood, ensuring that the proper amount is taken and that all blood is properly labeled. Although their main responsibility is drawing blood and preparing it for lab testing, Phlebotomists are also responsible for collecting specimens of other bodily fluids for testing as well.

Where can they work?
Medical Laboratory Assistants, EKG Technicians, and Phlebotomists work in clinics, hospitals and private labs. Allied Health Professionals, including Laboratory Assistants, EKG Technicians, and Phlebotomists, work in every town, every city, and every part of the country.

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Phlebotomist

Lab Assistant, EKG Technician, and Phlebotomist Diploma Program

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There is a growing need for Allied Health Professionals such as Lab Assistants, EKG Technicians and Phlebotomists! With an aging population, increasing life expectancies, and more people than ever before with health insurance, the Healthcare industry is booming, and it depends upon Allied Health Professionals to keep it moving. As a Lab Assistant, EKG Technician, or Phlebotomist you can become a valuable member of the healthcare profession.

What do Lab Assistants, EKG Technicians and Phlebotomists do?
Medical laboratory assistants have duties that include running lab tests and preparing specimens. Lab assistants may also be responsible for planting microbiology specimens, performing routine and specialized tests, preparing and staining slides for analysis, recording testing information, cleaning and restocking the lab facility, keeping inventory, and ordering lab supplies.

EKG technicians work in healthcare facilities with doctors and technologists and specialize in electrocardiogram (EKG) testing for patients. EKG machines are complex devices that monitor the heart’s performance. This is done by attaching wires and electrodes to a patient’s chest, arms and legs.

Phlebotomists are the health care professionals who draw blood, ensuring that the proper amount is taken and that all blood is properly labeled. Although their main responsibility is drawing blood and preparing it for lab testing, Phlebotomists are also responsible for collecting specimens of other bodily fluids for testing as well.

Where can they work?
Medical Laboratory Assistants, EKG Technicians, and Phlebotomists work in clinics, hospitals and private labs. Allied Health Professionals, including Laboratory Assistants, EKG Technicians, and Phlebotomists, work in every town, every city, and every part of the country.

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Cardiovascular Technician

Lab Assistant, EKG Technician, and Phlebotomist Diploma Program

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There is a growing need for Allied Health Professionals such as Lab Assistants, EKG Technicians and Phlebotomists! With an aging population, increasing life expectancies, and more people than ever before with health insurance, the Healthcare industry is booming, and it depends upon Allied Health Professionals to keep it moving. As a Lab Assistant, EKG Technician, or Phlebotomist you can become a valuable member of the healthcare profession.

What do Lab Assistants, EKG Technicians and Phlebotomists do?
Medical laboratory assistants have duties that include running lab tests and preparing specimens. Lab assistants may also be responsible for planting microbiology specimens, performing routine and specialized tests, preparing and staining slides for analysis, recording testing information, cleaning and restocking the lab facility, keeping inventory, and ordering lab supplies.

EKG technicians work in healthcare facilities with doctors and technologists and specialize in electrocardiogram (EKG) testing for patients. EKG machines are complex devices that monitor the heart’s performance. This is done by attaching wires and electrodes to a patient’s chest, arms and legs.

Phlebotomists are the health care professionals who draw blood, ensuring that the proper amount is taken and that all blood is properly labeled. Although their main responsibility is drawing blood and preparing it for lab testing, Phlebotomists are also responsible for collecting specimens of other bodily fluids for testing as well.

Where can they work?
Medical Laboratory Assistants, EKG Technicians, and Phlebotomists work in clinics, hospitals and private labs. Allied Health Professionals, including Laboratory Assistants, EKG Technicians, and Phlebotomists, work in every town, every city, and every part of the country.

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Medical Assistant

Medical Assistant Diploma Program

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The United States is experiencing an increasing demand for Allied Health Professionals such as Medical Assistants! With an aging population, increasing life expectancies, and more people than ever before with health insurance, the Healthcare industry is booming, and it depends upon Allied Health Professionals to keep it moving. As a Medical Assistant you can become a valuable member of the healthcare profession, working with and alongside doctors to treat and take care of patients in need. Medical Assisting is a career that requires heart and deep compassion; it is a challenging career but very rewarding. If you think you would enjoy helping others, then you deserve to learn more about becoming a Medical Assistant.

What does a Medical Assistant do?
Medical assistants complete administrative and clinical tasks in the offices of physicians, hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Medical Assistants perform an assortment of clinical and clerical duties, including routine tasks and procedures such as measuring patients’ vital signs, administering medications and injections, recording information in medical recordkeeping systems, preparing and handling medical instruments and supplies, and collecting and preparing specimens of bodily fluids and tissues for laboratory testing. Administrative duties include answering telephones, greeting patients, updating and filing patients’ medical records, filling out insurance forms, handling correspondence, scheduling appointments, arranging for hospital admission and laboratory services, and handling billing and bookkeeping. Medical Assistants also act as a patient coordinator by providing a means of communication between patients, doctors and other health care providers.

Where can Medical Assistants work?
Medical Assistants work in clinics, hospitals and private labs. Allied Health Professionals, including Medical Assistants, work in every town, every city, and every part of the country.

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Medical Records and Health Information Technician

Medical Assistant Diploma Program

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The United States is experiencing an increasing demand for Allied Health Professionals such as Medical Assistants! With an aging population, increasing life expectancies, and more people than ever before with health insurance, the Healthcare industry is booming, and it depends upon Allied Health Professionals to keep it moving. As a Medical Assistant you can become a valuable member of the healthcare profession, working with and alongside doctors to treat and take care of patients in need. Medical Assisting is a career that requires heart and deep compassion; it is a challenging career but very rewarding. If you think you would enjoy helping others, then you deserve to learn more about becoming a Medical Assistant.

What does a Medical Assistant do?
Medical assistants complete administrative and clinical tasks in the offices of physicians, hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Medical Assistants perform an assortment of clinical and clerical duties, including routine tasks and procedures such as measuring patients’ vital signs, administering medications and injections, recording information in medical recordkeeping systems, preparing and handling medical instruments and supplies, and collecting and preparing specimens of bodily fluids and tissues for laboratory testing. Administrative duties include answering telephones, greeting patients, updating and filing patients’ medical records, filling out insurance forms, handling correspondence, scheduling appointments, arranging for hospital admission and laboratory services, and handling billing and bookkeeping. Medical Assistants also act as a patient coordinator by providing a means of communication between patients, doctors and other health care providers.

Where can Medical Assistants work?
Medical Assistants work in clinics, hospitals and private labs. Allied Health Professionals, including Medical Assistants, work in every town, every city, and every part of the country.

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Medical Biller/Coder/Office Specialist Diploma Program

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Now is a great time to consider beginning a career as a Medical Biller, Coder, or Office Specialist! The Healthcare industry is booming and as the American healthcare system modernizes, there is an increased focus on health data and the digitization of medical records. As a result, there is an increased demand for skilled billing and coding specialists. If you are organized, detail-oriented, and interested in a career in the medical field, then a career as a Medical Biller, Coder, or Office Specialist may be the right choice for you!

What does a Medical Coder/Biller/Office Specialist do?

Medical Billers, Coders, and Office Specialists are the healthcare professionals responsible for many important tasks in the medical office. Medical Coders and Billers work hand in hand to translate healthcare services rendered into requests for payment from insurance companies. First, a Medical Coder codes individual patient services and diagnoses, then a Medical Biller uses those codes to request payment from the patient’s insurance company. Together, these two positions perform a vital administrative task of healthcare, freeing doctors and other medical staff to provide care to patients.

Where can Medical Coders/Billers/Office Specialists work?

Medical Billers, Coders, and Office Specialists may work in a variety of medical environments including private medical practices, medical billing companies, hospitals, clinics, and insurance companies. Administrative medical office positions such as these are found in every part of the country; some individuals may find they are able to work from their own home.

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Contact Phone Number

210-465-1794

Address

5819 NW Loop 410-Ste 160
San Antonio, TX 78238
United States